Marshmallow Icing


This recipe requires few ingredients and as long as you have a stand mixer it's very simple.

Marshmallow Icing

2 Cups granulated sugar
1 Tablespoon Cream of Tartar
3/4 Cup water
1 1/4 Cup pasteurized egg whites (Whippin' Whites or Eggology), at room temp.
1 Cup miniature marshmallows


In a medium sauce pan bring sugar, cream tartar and water to a boil. Reduce heat to medium and continue boiling until syrup reaches soft-ball stage (235 degrees).

While syrup is boiling, whip egg whites to medium peaks (Stop mixer and lift beater out of whites. Foam peaks should rise up but bend over just at the end.). Run mixer at lowest speed until syrup reaches proper temp.

With the mixer running, slowly pour in a stream of syrup near the side of the bowl (out of the way of the turning beater). Increase mixer speed to medium-high and add marshmallows, a few at a time.

Don't forget to turn off the burner of the stove.

Beat at highest speed (work up to highest speed if it threatens to leap out of the bowl) until the bowl is cool to the touch, about 25 minutes.


After adding syrup

Getting impatient waiting for the bowl to cool down.

Finally!

Ice cooled cakes immediately for best result.
If allowed to stand in the mixing bowl, icing will dry out a bit and become quite bubbly. If this happens simply re-whip until it comes back together.
Icing may be refrigerated up to 1 week. To use after refrigeration, add a bit more cream of tartar (up to 1/2 tablespoon) and whip until icing becomes smooth and fluffy. Some volume will be lost after refrigeration.


*Makes enough to ice and decorate two 10-inch cakes (pictured at top).


This icing does not sag or weep like regular meringue and 'toasts' just fine with a kitchen torch. I have not attempted to toast this icing with an oven broiler.

14 comments:

AnnieKNodes said...

Mmmmm. Looks so good! Are pasteurized egg whites something you find in the grocery store? I've never seen them. But then, NYC grocery stores are pretty skimpy.

Grommie said...

Yes Annie I get pasteurized egg whites in the grocery. Typically they are near whole eggs in the carton. The problem is, unless you know the specific product you are looking for you need to read the label and make sure it lists "for whipping" or "for meringue" or the product has been over pasteurized and while it is still fine to eat as an egg white omelet or to use in a white cake recipe it will never whip beyond foam.

I can also find clear plastic cartons of Eggology "100% egg whites" in the refrigerated organic section of some grocery stores. These are also pasteurized.

http://www.eggology.com/questions.htm

KitchenPrincess said...

Can you use egg whites you seperate yourself?
i plan to make a cake, ice it - travel to the destination (a camp out) and then toast with a kitchen torch
will that work?

Grommie said...

Hi kitchenprincess,
I don't see why that wouldn't work. I don't usually toast this marshamllow icing but it will toast lightly. Care to share what type of cake you're bringing to the camp out?

Anonymous said...

how many cups of eggwhites if ill use the fresh one?

Grommie said...

Hi Anonymous,
1 1/4 cup egg whites equals about 9 separated agg whites.

Thanks for asking!

Sabs said...

Hi there! I am a cupcake lover and was browsing for yummy icing to try and I came across your page :) I just finished making (or my kitchen aid is still at work, the icing is still cooling as we speak) and I must say... THIS RECIPE IS AMAZING!!! I love it!! Thanks so much for sharing!!

piratebear said...

I'm planning on using this recipe to decorate some rice krispie squares for a kids function and kind of like pipe little sail boats out of it. Will it hold up to being piped and hold its shape or will it not be a good consistency for that?

Anonymous said...

Hey, I plan on making this cake for my friends birthday tomorrow morning. Should I make the icing today and then store it, then frost the cake tomorrow morning. Or should I frost it tonight, because I'm scared that the icing will "melt" and just not hold it's shape overnight. I want the icing to be as fluffy as possible. Do I have to torch the cake right before serving or can I torch it today? Sorry for the questions...

Grommie said...

This icing holds up really well and will even stand being in the fridge without weeping.

Toast it now or later ... your choice.

Anonymous said...

Hi. I tried. It's really delicious. But after a while, the icing became watery. Did I do something wrong? I would like to know if there's a way to make the icing thicker?

Grommie said...

Do you mean that beads of moisture formed on the top of the icing?

Sometimes if your refrigerator is very humid inside icings will get beads of moisture that form.

Also, I have had left-over icing that sometimes will pool a little moisture in the container. When I whip the icing it comes back pretty well.

For thicker icing, boil your sugar slightly longer, add a pinch more cream of tartar, and a few more marshmallows.

allyn said...

is pasteurized egg white and isomalt the same?

Anonymous said...

Hi Grommie! If I frost a cake with this, does it require refrigeration? If so, how long can the cake stay in the open before the icing goes bad?